Truck drivers

Truck drivers

Found 19 result(s). Page 2 of 2.

Socialist Review: Trouble brewing in China

What are the main reasons behind the upsurge of strikes in China recently? There are lots of different reasons. The most fundamental is that workers don't really have any other option if they want to pursue their economic interests or defend their legal rights. There is no established system of dialogue workers can use to express their grievances with employers. The only way they can get their voices heard is basically to go on strike.

18/04/2012

Ten transport strikes reported in the last month

There have been at least ten transport strikes in China over the last month, highlighting once again the high costs and unfair work practices bus and taxi drivers have to endure, and the continued willingness of transport workers to take to the streets in protest. China Labour Bulletin’s 2011 strike map documented five bus strikes and five protests by taxi drivers in October in towns and cities across China. These reported incidents are almost certainly just a small proportion of the actual number of protests.
03/11/2011

Shanghai and Hangzhou protests highlight growing frustration of taxi drivers across China

The at times violent strike by thousands of taxi drivers in Hangzhou and a smaller protest by drivers at one company in Shanghai on 1 August are the latest in series of strikes and go-slows by cabdrivers in China this year, angry at rising fuel prices, the charges and restrictions imposed by the cab companies, and the lack of effective government regulation.
02/08/2011

Democracy Digest: China’s elite fears labor’s potential leverage

What explains China’s differing approach to protests by workers and dissidents? Why did the Communist authorities capitulate so readily to striking workers while rights activists are subjected to “the harshest clampdown since the crushing of the Tiananmen democracy movement in 1989”?
17/05/2011

Wall Street Journal: Unions Are Good for Business in China

For a long time it seemed to some that China's lack of independent labor unions was an advantage. Wages stayed low, and Chinese industry didn't have to worry about strike disruptions. This was always a disadvantage for workers. But now the costs of this strategy for employers and the government also are coming more sharply into focus, thanks to a four-day truck drivers' strike in Shanghai last month.
06/05/2011

Washington Post: China's trade union takes up a new cause — workers

China’s only legal trade union organization, a tool of Communist Party control long scorned by workers as a shill for big business, is experimenting with a novel idea: speaking up for labor.
29/04/2011

Shanghai truckers strike highlights lack of communication channels

Hundreds of truck drivers staged protests in Shanghai’s port district this week, leading to clashes with the police and several arrests. The drivers, mostly independent operators from outside the city demanded an increase in their flat-fee haulage payment to offset rising fuel costs.
23/04/2011

APM Marketplace: Chinese truck drivers protest rising fuel costs

Chinese police arrested and broke up hundreds of protesters today in Shanghai. The demonstrators were truck drivers angry over high gas prices and the rising cost of doing business there.
23/04/2011

A Journey into the Black Heart of Shanxi

THE northern province of Shanxi is the centre of China's ever expanding coal industry, and deep in the very heart of Shanxi are the mountainous rural county of Fenxi and the smoke enveloped city of . . .

06/06/2007
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